Weekly Packaging Design Wrap-Up: Packaging inspired by way nature packages fruits and vegetables, Sony's water bottle packaging for MP3 player shows instead of tells, researchers investigating use of legume by-products for packaging

LOS ANGELES , February 21, 2014 () – Packaging inspired by way nature packages fruits and vegetables



WikiPearls are natural, edible, biodegradable coatings that protect food and beverages from water loss and contaminant entry without exposing the products to unnatural materials like plastic or chemicals. Inspired by the way nature packages fruits and vegetables or the way a biological cell carries water, the coating is a gel made of food particles, nutritive ions and a polysaccharide—similar to that of the skin of a grape or coconut. WikiPearls can be used with a variety of products including ice cream and frozen yogurt, fruits and vegetables, cheese, soups, water and cocktails. They deliver functional nutrition in a bite-sized format, offering portability and portion control.

The primary source of this information is WikiFoods Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Paris, France


Sony’s water bottle packaging for MP3 player shows instead of tells



In the tradition of showing and not telling, Sony has packaged its waterproof W Series Walkman MP3 player in a water bottle that’s actually filled with water. The innovative packaging not only shows that the MP3 player can withstand water when swimmers listen to music in the pool, but also allows the product to be sold in gym vending machines, possibly next to actual beverages. According to a Youtube video, the package allows Sony to bring the product to its targeted market “right were they need it the most” rather than at electronics retailers.

The primary source of this information is The Next Web


Researchers investigating use of legume by-products for packaging



A new research project titled Leguval is aiming to develop protein films made of legume by-products for packaging applications. The protein film would provide a cost-effective, biodegradable packaging solution that extends the shelf life of goods. It would allow legume producers to reduce the volume of waste to be disposed of in landfills or incinerated. Instead, the film could be disposed of in compost plans or used for biogas production. Proteins could also be manipulated to create edible packaging for food products. The three-year research project is funded by the Seventh Framework Programme and is being handled by a consortium of research, technology and development performers from Europe.

The primary source of this information is leguval.eu, EU Seventh Framework Programme

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