K-C Worldwide's US patent application for 'tissue products having a high degree of cross machine direction stretch' published online

WASHINGTON , February 13, 2014 () – A patent application by the inventors Hermans, Michael Alan (Neenah, WI); Nelson, Samuel August (Menasha, WI); Sachs, Mark William (Appleton, WI), filed on September 30, 2013, was made available online on February 6, 2014, according to news reporting originating from Washington, D.C., by VerticalNews correspondents.

This patent application is assigned to Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.

The following quote was obtained by the news editors from the background information supplied by the inventors: "In the field of tissue products, such as facial tissue, bath tissue, table napkins, paper towels and the like, the cross machine direction (CD) stretch of a sheet of paper is an important characteristic or property. As tissue products tend to fail in the cross machine direction, an increase in the CD stretch will generally increase the durability and strength of the tissue product at a given tensile strength. Similarly, increasing CD stretch may also improve the hand feel of the tissue product in-use. Increased CD stretch may also improve the manufacturing efficiency of tissue products, particularly the efficiency of converting operations, which would benefit from increases in strength and durability. Thus, it may be desirable to increase the amount of CD stretch over that which is obtained by conventional methods and found in conventional sheets. For example, a creped tissue may have a CD stretch of about 4 to about 5 percent. These levels of CD stretch have been increased in through-air dried uncreped tissues, such as those disclosed in commonly assigned U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,017,417, 7,156,953 and 7,294,229, to about 10 percent. While these products have increased CD stretch, the need remains for tissue basesheets having even higher degrees of CD stretch while retaining other important sheet properties.

"Furthermore, many methods for increasing stretch tend to decrease tensile strength. For example, creping is often used to increase machine direction stretch, but creping tends to decrease the strength of the web. Similarly, foreshortening of the web in the CD can reduce CD tensile strength. As both tensile and stretch are important to web durability, it is desired to simultaneously have both high CD tensile and high CD stretch to maximize the durability of the web in the CD. While MD and CD tensile can be increased by refining or strengthening agents, it is not desirable to significantly increase the MD tensile as this excessively reduces the softness of the web. As such, the need remains for tissue basesheets having even higher degrees of CD stretch and CD tensile while retaining other important sheet properties."

In addition to the background information obtained for this patent application, VerticalNews journalists also obtained the inventors' summary information for this patent application: "It has now been surprisingly discovered that levels of CD stretch may be increased by manufacturing a tissue sheet using a process in which the nascent web is subjected to two distinct rush transfers. The term 'rush transfer' generally refers to the process of subjecting the nascent web to differing speeds as it is transferred from one fabric in the papermaking process to another. The present disclosure provides a process in which the nascent web is subjected to two distinct rush transfers, the first occurring when the web is transferred from the forming fabric to the transfer fabric, i.e., the 'first position,' and the second occurring when the web is transferred from the transfer fabric to the through-air drying fabric (TAD) fabric, i.e., the 'second position.' The overall speed differential between the forming fabric and the TAD fabric may be, for example, from about 10 to about 50 percent, with the amount of rush transfer being divided between the first and second position in a manner sufficient to achieve the desired CD stretch and other sheet properties.

"Accordingly, in certain embodiments the present disclosure offers an improvement in papermaking methods and products, by providing a tissue sheet and a method to obtain a tissue sheet, with improved CD stretch. Thus, by way of example, the present disclosure provides a tissue sheet having a CD stretch greater than about 15 percent and a CD tensile strength greater than about 750 grams per 3 inches. The increase in CD stretch improves the hand feel of the tissue product, while also reducing the tendency of a sheet to tear in the machine direction (MD) in use.

"In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a tissue web comprising one or more tissue plies, at least one tissue ply having a percent CD stretch greater than about 15 percent and a CD tensile strength greater than about 750 grams per 3 inches.

"In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a multi-ply tissue web comprising two or more plies, the product having a percent CD stretch greater than about 18 percent and a CD tensile strength greater than about 700 grams per 3 inches.

"In still other aspects, the present disclosure provides a rolled tissue product comprising a tissue web spirally wound into a roll, the wound roll having a roll bulk of at least about 22 cc/g and a Kershaw firmness of less than about 7 mm.

"In another aspect, the present disclosure provides a method of making a tissue sheet comprising the steps of: (a) depositing an aqueous suspension of papermaking fibers onto a forming fabric traveling at a first rate of speed to form a wet web; (b) dewatering the web to a consistency of about 20 percent or greater; © rush transferring the dewatered web to a transfer fabric, the transfer fabric traveling at a rate of speed from about 1 to about 30 percent slower than the speed of the forming fabric; (d) rush transferring the web to a throughdrying fabric, the throughdrying fabric traveling at a rate of speed from about 1 to about 30 percent slower than the speed of the transfer fabric; and (e) throughdrying the web.

"In still other aspects the present disclosure provides a method of making a tissue product having high CD stretch and tensile, the method comprising the steps of: (a) depositing an aqueous suspension of papermaking fibers onto a forming fabric traveling at a first rate of speed to form a wet web; (b) dewatering the web to a consistency of about 20 percent or greater; © rush transferring the dewatered web to a transfer fabric, the transfer fabric traveling at a rate of speed from about 1 to about 30 percent slower than the speed of the forming fabric; (d) rush transferring the web to a throughdrying fabric, the throughdrying fabric traveling at a rate of speed from about 1 to about 30 percent slower than the speed of the transfer fabric; and (e) throughdrying the web to form a tissue product, the tissue product having a percent CD stretch greater than about 15 percent and a CD tensile strength greater than about 800 grams per 3 inches.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

"FIG. 1 illustrates one method of manufacturing a tissue product according to the present disclosure;

"FIG. 2 illustrates the percent CD stretch (vertical axis) versus the percent rush transfer at the second location (horizontal axis) for various tissue products prepared according to the present disclosure;

"FIG. 3 illustrates the percent CD stretch (vertical axis) versus the percent rush transfer at the second location (horizontal axis) for various tissue products prepared according to the present disclosure;

"FIG. 4 illustrates the percent CD stretch (vertical axis) versus the percent rush transfer at the second location (horizontal axis) for various tissue products prepared according to the present disclosure;

"FIG. 5 illustrates the percent CD stretch (vertical axis) versus the percent rush transfer at the second location (horizontal axis) for various tissue products prepared according to the present disclosure;

"FIG. 6 illustrates CD TEA (gf*cm/cm.sup.2) (vertical axis) versus percent rush transfer at the second location (horizontal axis) for various tissue products prepared according to the present disclosure; and

"FIG. 7 illustrates CD TEA (gf*cm/cm.sup.2) (vertical axis) versus percent rush transfer at the second location (horizontal axis) for various tissue products prepared according to the present disclosure."

URL and more information on this patent application, see: Hermans, Michael Alan; Nelson, Samuel August; Sachs, Mark William. Tissue Products Having a High Degree of Cross Machine Direction Stretch. Filed September 30, 2013 and posted February 6, 2014. Patent URL: http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=6311&p=127&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&S1=20140130.PD.&OS=PD/20140130&RS=PD/20140130

Keywords for this news article include: Kimberly-Clark Worldwide Inc.

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