Canadian consumers may be confused by different allergy labels commonly used on food products, study says; some labels less effective than others in helping consumers avoid potentially dangerous foods, researchers claim

LOS ANGELES , April 6, 2012 () – A new study by the McGill University Health Center in Montreal said Canadian consumers may be confused by the different allergy labels commonly used on food products, Reuters reported April 5.

Researchers found that people were more likely to ignore warning labels if their households were directly rather than indirectly affected by food allergies. Those who belonged to advocacy groups, meanwhile, were most vigilant about their food purchases.

Although all these labels warn that a product could harm a person with allergies, they present that message in various ways, the study pointed out. Researchers found that some labels were less effective than others in helping consumers avoid potentially dangerous foods.

According to the study, 44% of directly affected consumers from the general public said they would buy a product that warned it "may contain peanut/tree nut/sesame." Sixteen percent of consumers indirectly affected by food allergies said they would buy a product with this label.

The primary source of this article is Reuters, London, England, on April 5, 2012.

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