Ontario shutting down two more coal-fired plants at Nanticoke Generating Station; 10 out of 19 units to be shuttered by Dec. 31, with coal use cut by 90% since 2003

MCGUINTY, Ontario , December 5, 2011 (press release) – Ontario is permanently shutting down two more dirty coal-fired units at Nanticoke Generating Station, ensuring cleaner air and a healthier future for families.

As of December 31, Ontario will have shut down 10 of 19 coal units and cut the use of coal by nearly 90 per cent since 2003.

By the end of 2014, Ontario will be the first jurisdiction in the world to replace dirty coal-fired generation with more sustainable alternatives such as wind, solar and bioenergy -- the equivalent of taking seven million cars off the road. This is the single largest climate change initiative being undertaken in North America and will lead to savings of $4.4 billion a year in health care, environmental and financial costs.

Building a clean energy system that supports healthier families, a healthier environment and a healthier economy is part of the McGuinty government's plan to create and support jobs for Ontario families while ensuring we have the electricity we need to power our homes, schools, hospitals and our economy.

QUICK FACTS

  • By the end of 2011, Ontario will have closed four of Nanticoke's eight units.
  • Since 2003 Ontario has brought more than 9,000 megawatts of new and refurbished clean energy online - enough to power cities the size of Ottawa and Toronto.
  • Since its launch one year ago, Ontario's Long-Term Energy Plan has helped create over 20,000 new jobs, with 30,000 more to come by the end of 2012.
  • More than 30 companies have invested in Ontario's clean-energy economy including, manufacturers of solar and wind energy components, companies generating energy, and specialist engineering and service firms.
  • According to a 2008 study from the Canadian Medical Association, Ontario's economic cost related to air pollution, in terms of lost productivity, healthcare costs, quality of life and loss of life, is almost $4 billion.
  • Ontario Power Generation (OPG) is required to meet strict government-mandated greenhouse gas emission targets. For example, OPG must ensure that 2011 emissions are two-thirds less than 2003 levels.

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