Sales of children's print books remain robust as digital-book touting parents shun electronic books for their children; digital sales account for less than 5% of total children's book sales annually

LOS ANGELES , November 20, 2011 () – At a time when sales of electronic books in some adult book categories account for more than 25% of total annual sales, sales of children’s print books have remained robust as digital-book touting parents shun electronic books for their children, the New York Times reported Nov. 20.

Electronic sales account for less than 5% of total children’s book sales annually.

Parents say that they want their children to experience turning the pages, and say that books may be more spill-proof than their paper counterparts.

Children prefer receiving physical gifts rather than gift cards or copies of e-books.

Parents often prefer being able to flip through an entire book before they purchase it for their children, something that they cannot do with an electronic book.

Parents say that their children might become distracted with a device such as an iPad or iPhone, whereas with the physical book they can concentrate on reading.

The primary source of this article is the New York Times, New York, New York, on Nov. 20, 2011.

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